Nashville – The Welge Report

 

Hello Fellow Travelers:

Welcome to our world of business information, museums, adventure, birding, botanical gardens, good eating and fine wines.  This newsletter provides you with “The Welge Report for Nashville .

Please share it with your friends, customers and associates.  You can also access more than 100 cities on our website plus lots of other helpful travel tips at:  thewelgereport.com

Recognition:  We extend special thanks to the people who manage and/or own the institutions, museums and restaurants featured in our guides.  In some instances we have relied on their descriptions and photos.

 

Nashville

 

Birding Opps Info for our birding friends.  In and near Nashville you can see these species: Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Ross’s Goose, Trumpter Swan, Blue-winged Teal, Bufflehead, Greater Prariie Chicken, Red-throated Loon, Northern Mockingbird and Northern Flicker.

The Tennessee Ornithological Society (.tnbirds.org/birdfinding/M-TNbirding.htm) provides birding hot spots, bird records and field check lists.

At Tennessee State Parks (http://tnstateparks.com/activities/birding) they list the parks and their facilities.

Nashville Outdoors (nashvilleoutdoors.net/birdwatching.html) gives bird counts, breeding and migratory habits.

PublicTransportation:  This is your site for public transportation (nashvillemta.org)

Amtrak (www.amtrak.com) – Your connection to more than 500 stations in 46 states. For online information and train schedules visit www.amtrak.com or call 1-800-USA-RAIL (1-800-872-7245)

Business Information:  Here is help in regard to your business: (krakow-info.com/business.htm)

 

Day One:  After dropping your bags off your first stop is Ryman Auditorium – Daily: 9-4, 116 5th Ave N, 615-889-3060.

The Ryman has lots of aliases – “Mother Church of Country Music – Carnegie Hall of the South – Historically Cool Since 1892” and it still has events featuring great artists.  Check with the box office to find out who is scheduled.  Self Guided and Back Stage Tours are available daily.

It’s time to stretch your legs at the Centennial Park – formerly known as the West Side Park.  In 1897 it was the site for the Tennessee Centennial and International Exhibition.

You’ll want to visit the Parthenon replica that is partially responsible for Nashville being known as the “Athens of the South”.  Replicas of the Parthenon Marbles are direct castes of the original sculptures.

It now functions as an art museum.  Within the Parthenon is a statue of Athena who stands 42 feet high and is gilded with more than 8 pounds of gold leaf.

Lunch is at Arnold’s Country Kitchen – L: M-F, 605 8th Avenue S., 615-256-4455.

 

Arnold’s is pure Nashville turning out fried chicken, chicken fried steak, fried green tomatoes, mac ‘n cheese, turnip greens, baked or grilled corn bread and pecan pie.

 

Belle Meade Plantation – M-Sa: 9-5, Su: 11-5, 5025 Harding Pike, 615- 356-0501 has lots of interesting things to see.

At the Belle Meade Plantation your tour includes the Greek-Revival mansion, a dairy, horse stables, carriage house, mausoleums, gardens and a log cabin.  The last stop is at their winery where you can taste their wines.

Etch – L: M-F, D: M-Sa, 303 Demonbreun St, 615-522-0685 is your dining place this evening.

As an appetizer the Butter Tasting is unique but our choice is the Roasted Cauliflower with truffled pea pesto, salted almonds and feta dip accompanied with a glass of ’11 Claar Cellars Riesling.

For your entrée the Turkish spiced Cobia with capers, olives, raisins, almonds, feta and brown buttered orange is excellent as is the Duck Ratatouille Crudo.

The ’08 Cantina Valpantena Amarone is a good match. Your dessert could be the chocolate pretzel bar.

 

Day Two: You gotta have breakfast at the Loveless Café – B,L,D: Daily,  8400 Tennessee 100, 615-646-9700.

The breakfast platters come with biscuits and grits or potatoes.  You have lots of protein choices: country ham, bacon, sausage, pork barbecue and steak.

They also have omelets, pancakes and French toast.

The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum – Daily: 9-5, 222 5th Ave S, 615-416-2001.  Whether you’re a fan of country music or not this  is a great place to visit.

The library and archive has more than forty years’ of music books, photos, video and film and sound recordings.  The moving image collection has more than 23,000 images.

The Bob Pinson Recorded Sound Collection has 98% of all pre-World War II country recordings ever made.

The artifact collection includes more than 800 stage costumes and over 600 instruments

The Hall of Fame Rotunda is round to ensure that every Hall of Fame member has a place of equal importance. “Will the circle be unbroken?”

The RCA Studio B – Daily: 9-5, 1611 Roy Acuff Place, Roy Acuff Pl, 800-852-6437 is a separate part of the Country Music Hall of Fame that you don’t want to miss.

RCA Studio B-was the recording home of Elvis Presley, Chet Atkins, Eddy Arnold, and the Everly Brothers.

Other artists who recorded here are Eddy Arnold, Waylon Jennings, Bobby Bare, Dolly Parton, Jim Reeves, Willie Nelson, Floyd Cramer and many, many more.

Lunch today is at Marche Artisan Foods – B,L,D: Tu-Su, D: Tu-Sa, 1000 Main St, 615-262-1111.

For starters you can share the marinated olives with fennel and orange or the artisan cheese plate.  And for your main the Salad Nicoise is excellent as is the Vietnamese Chicken salad.

Your wine is the ’11 Gerard Bertrand Pinot Noir and the peanut butter cheesecake is your dessert.

 

You’ll want to visit the Johnny Cash Museum – Daily: 11-7, 119 3rd Ave S, Nashville, 615-256-1777 The collection includes early letters and documents from his childhood, Air Force service and adulthood.

In the library you can see Johnny’s performances and TV appearances.

 

Whether you can “hear that train a comin” or not it’s interesting to visit the Tennessee Central Railway Museum – M-Sa: 9-3, 220 Willow St, 615-244-9001.

Their mission is to educate you about America’s railroads.  The museum has a library and a collection of railroad artifacts.   You can book a special excursion that always includes a special entertainment feature.

 

 Rolf & Daughters – D: Nightly, 700 Taylor St, 615-866-9897 is a Nashville dining hot spot.

      

The sourdough with seaweed butter and the crostini with a vegetarian escabeche are good starters.

The octopus is served with black garlic, tomato, fennel and croutons and the brook trout comes with cucumber, dill and nasturtium.  The squid trafie is their signature dish.

Your wine is not seen on many lists – the ’11 Ribolla Brda Movia is a good match.

 

Day Three:  Fido – B,L,D: Daily, 1812 21st Ave S, 615-777-3436 is your spot to start the day.

Variaties of your scramble, hash browns and toast include: steak, salmon and bubba.  They have huevos rancheros and Cubanos.   You can get sweet potato French toast, pancakes and buttermilk semolina.  It’s all good.

 

Start your day at the Tennessee State Museum – Tu-Sa: 10-5, Su: 1-5, 505 Deaderick St, 615-741-2692.

Displays of Tennessee-made furniture, silver, weapons, quilts, paintings, an 18th century print shop, pioneer cabin, Antebellum parlor and Victorian painting gallery provide a background for early life in Tennessee.

The Museum’s Civil War holdings of uniforms, battle flags and weapons are among the finest in the nation.

The museum has many one-of-a-kind items associated with such famous Americans as Andrew Jackson, Daniel Boone, James K. Polk, Andrew Johnson, David Crockett, Sam Houston, Alvin York and Cordell Hull.

There are special exhibits about African American soldiers in the Civil War, a free black family living in Knoxville before 1860 and the women’s suffrage movement.

 

It’s time to have Hattie B’s Hot Chicken – L: Daily, D: M-Sa, 112 19th Ave S, 615-678-4794.

At Hattie’s you can get hot or medium, white or dark, iced tea or cold beer, banana pudding or cobbler.

You get two sides. Your choices are: greens, fries, pimento mac and cheese, baked beans, potato salad, cole slaw or black eyed pea salad.

 

Continuing in an educational vein it’s important to visit The Hermitage – Home of President Andrew Jackson – Daily: 8:30-5, 4580 Rachels Ln, 615-889-2941.

The mansion was built in 1819, rebuilt in 1834 after a fire and had alterations after his return from Washington in 1877.

It opened as a museum in 1889 and was further restored between 1989 and 1997.   It is considered the best preserved of early U.S. presidential homes.

You can also walk about the grounds, the Southern gardens and the museum.   Most of Jackson’s letters and papers are not at the Hermitage.  They are in the Library of Congress.

 

Your last place to visit on this trip is The Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art – Tu-Su: 9-5, 1200 Forrest Park Dr, 615-356-8000.

The Cheekwood House  was built by the Cheek family in the early 1930’s with the proceeds from the sale of their coffee company “Maxwell House”.

In the 1950s descendants of the Cheeks offered the property as a site for a botanical garden and art museum.

The Nashville Museum of Art donated its permanent collection to the Cheekwood, and it opened to the public in 1960.   The botanical gardens cover 55 acres and are comprised of different styles and periods with a wide selection of plants native to Middle Tennessee.

The permanent art collection is Americana in scope with 600 paintings and 5,000 prints, drawings and photos.  The decorative arts collection focuses on Worcester porcelain and American silver.

The Contemporary art includes paintings by Larry Rivers, Andy Warhol, Robert Ryman and Red Grooms.

You can’t visit Nashville without having BBQ and that’s why you’re going to Edley’s Bar-B-Que – L & D: Daily, 908 Main St, 615-873-4085.

Appetizers include fried okra, fried pickles, BBQ quesadillas and a sausage and cheese plate.  They have sandwiches and tacos, but our Cousin Roy advises you to go for the platters that include two sides.

Here are the usual BBQ suspects: pork, chicken, turkey, catfish and brisket.  The sides are all of the regulars plus frito pie.  Dessert is chess and pecan pie.

Another option is a Cousin Pam favorite – The Peg Leg Porker - M-Sa: 11AM-10PM, 903 Gleaves St, 615-829-6023

Cousin Pam starts with the Memphis Sushi which is a sausage cheese platter with saltines.

But she’s here for the pulled pork, ribs, smoked green beans and Mac & Cheese.

Lots of beer choices.  Dessert is the chocolate fried pie.

Your Nashville lagniappe is highly recommended by Cousin Pam – Robert’s Western World – M-Sa: 11AM-3AM,  Su: Noon-3AM,  Su: 10:30AM is gosepel fellowship and music, 416B Broadway, 615-244-1028

The house band is Jesse Lee Jones Brazilbilly.  The music is  non-stop with lots of different acts.  Enjoy a PBR and a burger.

 

Until next time, best wishes and happy travels,

Dick & Dee Welge 

© 2015 R.E. Welge All Rights Reserved. Use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Web Site Rules and Regulations of thewelgereport.com.  Any business use without permission forfeits your right to “hot chicken”.

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